Word Recognition &
Auditory Perception Lab

Villanova University | Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences

Word Recognition &
Auditory Perception Lab

Villanova University | Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences

Word Recognition &
Auditory Perception Lab

Villanova University | Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences

Word Recognition &
Auditory Perception Lab

Villanova University | Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences

Word Recognition &
Auditory Perception Lab

Villanova University | Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences


WRAP Lab

Speech Perception and Language Lab at Villanova University

Welcome to the Word Recognition & Auditory Perception Lab (WRAP Lab)! Our group studies how human listeners recognize speech and understand spoken language. Investigating language processing as it happens is central to our approach, and we use a combination of computational, cognitive neuroscience, and behavioral techniques to study these processes.

Find out more about our research on this site. Thanks for stopping by! — Joe Toscano


NEWS & UPDATES

Here's what we've been up to lately

February 2019

Perception of Mandarin tone by native and non-native speakers

WRAP Lab graduate student Agnes Gao published a paper in Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics that examines the effect of language background on speech perception. Using ERP measures to assess native and non-native speakers' perception of Mandarin tones, we found that both groups of listeners are sensitive to graded acoustic differences during speech processing, but they differ in their behavioral discrimination of the sounds. These results suggest that listeners maintain sensitivity to continuous acoustic cues even after learning phonological categories along an acoustic dimension.

Click here to read the paper.

December 2018

Perceptual encoding of natural speech sounds

In a paper published in Auditory Perception & Cognition, WRAP Lab grad students Olivia Pereira and Agnes Gao demonstrate that the auditory N1 ERP component can be used to measure speech sound encoding across a range of acoustic and phonological contrasts, indicating that the N1 provides a general measure of early speech processing. The results also suggest that phonetic distinctions are encoded in a way that reflects differences along specific acoustic cue dimensions. Overall, these data provide us with a more complete picture of early speech processing and shed light on which types of phonetic distinctions we can study using this technique.

Check out the paper here.

September 2018

Perceptual encoding in auditory brainstem responses

A new paper by WRAP Lab grad student, Lexie Tabachnick, published in the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, investigates how auditory brainstem responses to tones vary as a function stimulus frequency. This study demonstrates that the ABR can provide a useful index of perceptual encoding across a wide range of sound frequencies, with the amplitude of the ABR precisely tracking tone frequency from 500 to 8000 Hz. This provides a crucial counterpart to our work on perceptual encoding in cortical responses and offers new insights into how the ABR can be used to study auditory perception in normal-hearing listeners and to measure effects of hearing loss.

Click here to see the paper.

July 2018

Neuroimaging study reveals the time-course of speech perception

In a new paper published in Brain & Language, we used the fast optical imaging technique to study the time-course of speech perception. We show that the brain encodes sounds in terms of continuous acoustic cues at early stages of perception and rapidly begins to categorize them based on phonological differences. This technique allows us to study these responses non-invasively in human subjects. Check out the paper here.


CONTACT INFO

Please contact us if you would like to learn more about our research, request a copy of a paper, are interested in joining the lab, or have any other questions. Our email address is wraplab@villanova.edu.

Scheduled to participate in a study? The main lab is located in Tolentine Hall, Room 231. Some of our experiments also take place in the eye-tracking lab in Tolentine 18A. If you're scheduled to participate in an experiment but aren't sure where to go, please come to the main lab and a research assistant will meet you there!

Location: 231 Tolentine Hall
Phone: +1 610.519.3887
Email: wraplab@villanova.edu
Facebook: VU WRAP Lab
Villanova University
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences
800 E Lancaster Ave
Villanova PA 19085